How to make your employees love you after they leave you

How to make your employees love you after they leave you. | CareerSupport365_roller-coaster-ride-first-few-seconds-are-critical

image credit: https://goo.gl/mZOjP3

 

We all know that the first few seconds are critical in making good first impressions.

But research shows that both the most emotional and the last experiences matter most for long-term memories, stories, and impressions.

This is explained by Peak-End theory, made famous by the Nobel Laureate Daniel Kahneman.

To help understand this, Kahneman breaks the Self into 2 parts: the Experiencing Self and the Remembering Self.

The Remembering Self is the part of us that is full of stories, whereas the Experience Self is one that has done the event.

Kahneman emphasises that it is the peaks of emotions, the highs and lows as well as the feelings at the very end of an event that create the lasting impression.

This is shown in the following diagram:

How to make your employees love you after they leave you. | CareerSupport365_positive-memories-and-peak-end-theory

image credit: http://www.thepositiveencourager.global/?p=7161

 

Maybe you can relate this to any roller coaster ride you have been on. If you are like me, a roller coaster ride normally starts a little slow – with your Experience Self anticipating excitement, fear and dread (high emotions) from the moment you sit down and get automatically locked in to place.

Your Experience Self knows that there will be hills to climb only to be met by gut-wrenching slopes on descent, over what might seem like an eternity. (When will this end?) More often than not it is that last crazy roll or water feature that is the wow… But it is your Remembering Self that recalls time and again some of the twists and turns and especially how the ride finished up.

I have been on many rides, but normally it's the last few seconds that I remember most. Case in point: Splash Mountain, Wet and Wild… I am sure it's the same with you.

How to make your employees love you after they leave you. | CareerSupport365_splash-mountain

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Peak-End theory can be applied in a number of contexts:

Everyday we experience Peak-End theory in play.

1. A customer experience: the during the sale, end of sale and post sale experiences. Word of mouth and stories on the experiences are what fuel dinner table discussions.

2. A dining experience: how does the waiting staff treat the diner; what's the food like; how are complaints handled; how is the bill presented; what were the end-of-the-dinner mints like – why is it that we recall the mints that accompanied the bill the most?

How to make your employees love you after they leave you. | CareerSupport365_after-dinner-mints

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3. An employee being laid off: how is the message communicated; the experience of breaking the news; the communication process; the dignity factor; the support afforded to the exiting employee.

It's no wonder that when there are poor last experiences, it motivates an ex-employee to post adverse comments online.

How to make your employees love you after they leave you. | CareerSupport365_working-for-a-company-with-a-bad-reputation

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Conclusion:

It has been often said that you only get one chance to make a first impression. The same can be said about last impressions.

Regardless of whatever the event is, a leader thinks through how the event will be experienced – including the highs and the lows – but pay especially deep attention to the last/end experience, the one that supports the Remembering Self.

Those that end an event with a positive hand off are bound to be remembered far more positively – creating e stories and memories of your interactions even when the middle might have been anything but that.

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About the author:

Greg Weiss is one of Australia’s most renowned career coaches. He is the author of “So You Got A Job, WTF Is Next”. The book prescribes a proven, practical 7 step guideline for new employees so they succeed, rather than fail their probation periods and beyond. Find out more about the book at https://www.wtfisnext.wtf/

He is the Founder and Director of Onboff an online training and coaching platform that helps HR specialists, coaches and recruiters to deliver exceptional onboarding and offboarding experiences for employees.

Greg also hosts The Keep: The Employee Experience podcast and runs CareerSupport365.

10 Tips on How to Treat Surviving Employees After a Round of Layoffs

10 Tips on How to Treat Surviving Employees After a Round of Layoffs | CareerSupport365

Here are 10 best practice tips I advise employers when they are faced with the unpleasant task of retrenching or making their employees redundant.

These tips will help to preserve a healthy employer brand and reputation which are critical to the ongoing sustainability of any employer.

1. Treat all exiting staff well on the way out.

My firm conducted research that showed that 88 percent of employees were still likely to talk poorly of their former employer 13 weeks after being laid off - especially if they had not been treated well on their departure.

There is an old marketing adage, that people are more inclined to complain and moan, than praise. If you are peeved, you will post. Peeved former employees post to Seek and Glassdoor and others. You don’t want that.

2. Clearly explain the rationale for the redundancies – that the decision is not personal to the redundant individual, but instead it’s business issues.

According to the USA Department of Labor, the average person will switch careers (not just jobs but entire careers) 14 times in their work life and 15 – 20 times according to Forbes. So  help your employees who have just been told they have been made redundant or retrenched that it’s not personal. This alone will make them feel better about themselves, their situation and the speed at which they can move on in their careers.

3. Give assurances to the surviving staff that the business is expected to improve by taking difficult measures and that their jobs are safe.

We suggest that you don’t make any promises to surviving staff that this is the end of the round of layoffs. However it is important you have a clear outline of the plan and genuinely communicate that the business is doing everything it can to not have further redundancies or retrenchments.

Having treated your departing employees with dignity and support, it also assures your surviving staff that they will also be treated with dignity and support in the event they may also face a layoff in the future.

4. Assure the survivors that management has been instructed to escalate cases of any increased workload that cannot be handled and capacity/process remedies will be considered where appropriate.

As a result of a round of layoffs, it’s often the case that the remaining staff are burdened with extra work that their former colleagues used to do. Surviving staff often feel a sense of overwhelm. This is further compounded by the survivor’s fear that if they were to say anything, their job may be put in jeopardy.

By giving staff permission to vent and communicate, the business can clear blockages and get on with business. If you do not provide the opportunity to communicate or vent,  it will inevitably cause presenteeism, bad mouthing, disengagement or worse still, harm to others or self harm.

5. Offer outplacement support to all departing employees.

According to CareerSupport365 research:

  • 90 percent of departing employees do not receive any outplacement or career transition support upon being laid off.
  • 89 percent of those laid off employees said they would have felt 'much more positive' towards their employer had their former employer provided them with outplacement or career transition support.
  • 95 percent of people would have felt ‘far less inclined’ to post adverse comments about their own former employers.

Knowing this, it just makes good business sense to offer outplacement services to all departing employees and letting survivors know that their former colleagues were provided with career transition support.

6. Pre-empt any adverse impacts on staff, morale, and productivity.

In case there is adverse publicity, have a communication plan that rolls out to staff. Think of having regular 'brown bag' lunches, videos issued by the Executive, Department staff meetings and so on.

Ask staff that they can safely state how they are feeling, have their comments heard and acted upon by management and the Executive Leadership Team where possible.

7. Consider team building activities to form new and productive relationships.

New relationship need to be built, replacing old relationships that have ‘passed on’. Put together team activities so as to build trust, respect, new know-how and lines of communication.

8. Ensure that social media and traditional media channels are given enough information to reduce the impact of gossip, threats, from poaching recruiters and even taunts from former anonymous staff.

Make sure that your communications team is feeding relevant and platforms with your news and message. If you want the message to be what you want it to be, then you need to drive the content.

9. Appoint resources to monitor social media and employer review sites like Seek and Glassdoor and respond openly, authentically, and immediately.

Wherever possible, in dignified and respectful ways, answer adverse comments - rather than let them fester and at worse case spread unanswered.

Employer review sites like Seek and Glassdoor are  very well known for encouraging employees - past and present - to review their employers. They do impact your employer brand and reputation.

You need to drive your employer brand and not leave it to employees to do so uncontrolled!

10. Constantly inform surviving staff and other stakeholders how the company’s performance is improving.

Whether it may be good and bad news, it’s all important. Let all the staff know how the company is performing so there are no surprises. The more transparent you are, the less surprised people will be and the more creative many will become in helping its performance improve, especially when they are positively engaged and feeling like they are all in this together.

These 10 tips will enrich the engagement of surviving staff and improve sustainability of your business and help to preserve a healthy employer brand and reputation which are critical during these uncertain times.

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About the author:

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Greg Weiss is one of Australia’s most renowned career coaches. He is the author of “So You Got A Job, WTF Is Next”. The book prescribes a proven, practical 7 step guideline for new employees so they succeed, rather than fail their probation periods and beyond. Find out more about the book at https://www.wtfisnext.wtf/

He is the Founder and Director of Onboff an online training and coaching platform that helps HR specialists, coaches and recruiters to deliver exceptional onboarding and offboarding experiences for employees.

Greg also hosts The Keep: The Employee Experience podcast and runs CareerSupport365.

How to Personally and Clearly Lay Off Your Staff | CareerSupport365

How to Personally and Clearly Lay Off Your Staff

How to Personally and Clearly Lay Off Your Staff | CareerSupport365

The Power of Personally Laying off Staff

BMWs are fine on the road. But "Bitching, Moaning, and Whining" can be avoided at the water cooler or on gossip sites like Glassdoor when you are laying off staff.

I've heard of cases where mass redundancies were effected by SMS; where groups were lined up ahead of an 'execution room'; where staff waited nervously for a phone call to down tools and present to HR (yes, all these have happened.)

I firmly believe that if you hire personally, you must 'fire' personally.

'Firing' personally involves handling any termination notice in a way that:

  1. Protects you legally;
  2. Treats departing employees in a dignified and humane way;
  3. Helps make the departing employee feel as good as they are going to feel in an awkward, stressful, emotionally fraught, and delicate situation;
  4. Reduces the chances of the departing employee feeling worse than they need to;
  5. Reduces the chances of disengaging fellow work colleagues who are staying on at the employer.

The Power of Laying off with Clarity

In the context of you complying with your local employment laws: once the employee is advised there is a change of their employment, it's important to be clear in any notice discussion and then confirming the points of that discussion in a formal termination letter including these guidelines:

  1. Individually address the termination letter to each person being laid off;
  2. Sign each letter personally;
  3. Confirm that the decision is a hard one and that sadly the decision is final;
  4. Provide a clear outline of all statutory and contractual entitlements, benefits, and final pay;
  5. Provide a firm end-date;
  6. Advise (for those employees working through a notice period) what behaviours might be acceptable: e.g. you should allow people to go for interviews for other roles, but it would be expected that they provide appropriate notice to you;
  7. Explain what would be deemed fair performance standards during the notice period;
  8. That the departing staff members redundancy or exit is in accordance with applicable specific legislation;
  9. Where Employee Assistance Programs (EAP) and outplacement services are offered, provide welcome packs from the providers;
  10. Describe the level of EAP and outplacement services the departing employee is being accorded;
  11. Provide the name of the EAP and outplacement firm and the consultants/coaches with whom they are assigned to work;

By following these tips, exiting employees are less likely to have the 'BMW' driven down the aisles of the workstations or at the water cooler, or more importantly online via Glassdoor or similar gossip sites.

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About the author:

Greg Weiss is the Founder of CareerSupport365 and The First Few Seconds. He has almost 30 years success in HR and in career coaching people. The CareerSupport365's Innovative Outplacement Packages can be found here.