How to Find a Fulfilling Career

Roger is a recent commerce graduate with a noticeably extroverted nature.

And he’s in a great position - he has received two incredible job offers.

The first opportunity is with a high-profile company. The money and prestige are very appealing to Roger, but he will primarily be doing a backroom analytical role.

The second opportunity isn’t as prestigious. But Rogers gets the feeling he would have the freedom to express more of his inner motivations and personal narrative here.

Which opportunity do you think Roger will take?

Don’t be misled: money isn’t everything

Money and prestige are tempting factors when weighing up job opportunities. After all, you start to imagine the different ways these could improve your lifestyle and all of sudden it seems like the answer to all your problems is right in front of you.

The trouble is, these factors aren’t enough on their own. According to Herzberg’s Theory of Motivation, it isn’t just a case of being dissatisfied or satisfied with a job, for there are two sets of factors which govern negative and positive work attitudes.

When hygiene factors, like salary and job perks, aren’t met this breeds dissatisfaction. But, when they are met, satisfaction is still not guaranteed. That is because positive attitudes towards work also depend on motivation factors being adequate.

Therefore, an enriched career also depends on your values, motivations and the working culture that is best suited to your personality.

In other words, it must incorporate what is most important to you.

Why are values so important?

Your values are what you stand for, what you represent.

If you aren’t aware of what’s important to you, it will be unclear which is the best road to take.

That applies to all decisions you’ll make in your life - not just how to find a fulfilling career. However, values are handy filters for evaluating job opportunities and the organisational culture of a new employer.

Even though it looks as though Roger is going to take the first job opportunity, I believe this a mistake, and he will be a square peg in a round hole.

Why? One of Roger’s core values is extroversion. If his new workplace doesn’t provide him with the environment to express this value, he is going to feel this misalignment of values significantly. And that is likely to breed poor motivation, performance and levels of satisfaction - not the enriched career he deserves.

If you want to learn more about how to find a fulfilling career and evaluate job opportunities, reach out to me directly or get your hands on a copy of my upcoming release: So You’re Career Confused! WTF is Next?

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Greg Weiss is Australia’s leading career coach. He is the author of “So You Got The Job! WTF Is Next?”. The book prescribes a proven, practical 7-step guideline for new employees so they succeed, rather than fail their probation periods and beyond. Find out more about the book at https://www.wtfisnext.wtf


He is the Founder and Director of Onboff an online training and coaching platform that helps HR specialists, coaches and recruiters to deliver exceptional onboarding and offboarding experiences for employees.


He also hosts The Keep: The Employee Experience podcast and runs CareerSupport365.

 

Keyword: How to find a fulfilling career

How to Test Out a New Career and Make the Right Decision

Rochelle had been doing marketing for for-profit organisations for many years, before getting the opportunity to move into marketing for membership-based businesses.
 
With her natural ability for marketing and her wealth of experience, Rochelle continued to perform well and enjoyed her new role. Recently, Rochelle was offered a fantastic opportunity that she just couldn’t pass up. And so she stepped up into the role of CEO for a membership-based organisation.
 
Unfortunately, Rochelle is now in over her head. She goes to work every day feeling like an imposter. She feels stuck, empty and is wondering when those around her will start to notice her failings in this new career too.
 
Have you ever jumped into a new role, and despite your enthusiasm, found it wasn’t what you expected?
 

Always test the waters first

It’s not surprising if you have. After all, research shows we’re not well equipped to make good predictions about how we’ll feel when doing something new.
 
That proves especially true when you haven’t taken some key steps to understand a new role better and mitigate any potential surprises.
 
Luckily, there’s a solution. When you’re facing an opportunity for a new career, or are even just contemplating the idea of one, I always recommend testing the waters before making a decision.
 
That way you are the most informed you can be about the realities of a role, rather than just basing your decision on your own assumptions.
 
 One strategy for testing the waters is to have Prototype Conversations.
 

Have Prototype Conversations before deciding on a new career

According to Burnett and Evans, authors of Designing Your Life, talking to someone already living the life you want can be the best way to find out if what you believe is actually true.[1]
To have a Prototype Conversation, you should connect with people already working in the job or industry you’re interested in and ask them to share their story over a coffee.
 
It’s an opportunity to find out what they do and don’t like about the position, what surprised them about it when they started, and how they actually found themselves getting there. You should focus as much as possible on the factors you believe will make the job enriching for you, while also be aware of the clues they provide to those factors that could deplete your energy.
 
Ask as many questions as you can and try to limit talking about yourself. Your stake in the discussion is to gather as much useful information as possible.
 
There will always be something that surprises you about a new career.
 
Why not test the waters first?
 
For more strategies on how to test the waters of a new career, look out for my upcoming release: So You’re Career Confused! WTF is Next?
 
[1] “Designing Your Life” by B. Burnett & D. Evans. Published by Vintage Digital, 2016.
 
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Greg Weiss is Australia’s leading career coach. He is the author of “So You Got The Job! WTF Is Next?”. The book prescribes a proven, practical 7-step guideline for new employees so they succeed, rather than fail their probation periods and beyond. Find out more about the book at https://www.wtfisnext.wtf
He is the Founder and Director of Onboff an online training and coaching platform that helps HR specialists, coaches and recruiters to deliver exceptional onboarding and offboarding experiences for employees.
He also hosts The Keep: The Employee Experience podcast and runs CareerSupport365.

What is the Secret to Job Enrichment?

Rina did what she thought she was supposed to. She had the marks, she had parents with great jobs in the industry, and so she jumped headfirst into a career in health sciences.

But Rina was unhappy. Despite it all making sense on paper, Rina found that she didn’t fit with the people she worked with and Rina certainly didn’t fit the role she found herself in.

She dreaded each day and wondered if this was what the rest of her working life was going be like.

Have you ever made a career decision for the wrong reasons, like Rina?

Doing what you’re “supposed” to is a mistake

Without understanding the key components of an enriching career, it’s easy to look to the wrong things when making important decisions.

Outside pressure and expectations from others can make this even harder and cloud our judgement.

That’s why my model for pinpointing an enriching career requires one thing: self-reflection. When you understand yourself well, it’s easy to find where you naturally fit and thrive.

That model is strengths + love + importance + money (SLIM).

A model for finding job enrichment

An enriched career only comes when a job satisfies four components for you:

  1. Strengths: these are what you are good at and are indicated by your skills and accomplishments.
  2. Love: this is what you love to do and is informed by your interests.
  3. Importance: this is what is most important to you, based on your values, motivations and the type of working culture you fit with.
  4. Money: this means a career that is financially viable for you to do.

Through her own self-reflection, Rina realised that social impact work would satisfy the components of the SLIM model for her. But to take things one step further and ensure that this would be a healthy career move for her, Rina did something smart. She tested the waters and took on a 6-month temporary position doing work overseas for a not-for-profit. And then everything fell into place. Rina went on to make a successful transition.

Would you like to cast off the expectations of others and find job enrichment, just like Rina?

My upcoming book shows you how! Subscribe/follow for updates and be one of the first to read it.

Keyword: job enrichment

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Greg Weiss is Australia’s leading career coach. He is the author of “So You Got The Job! WTF Is Next?”. The book prescribes a proven, practical 7-step guideline for new employees so they succeed, rather than fail their probation periods and beyond. Find out more about the book at https://www.wtfisnext.wtf
He is the Founder and Director of Onboff an online training and coaching platform that helps HR specialists, coaches and recruiters to deliver exceptional onboarding and offboarding experiences for employees.
He also hosts The Keep: The Employee Experience podcast and runs CareerSupport365.

How to Change Careers with the Help of Lifelong Learning

Stuart always believed he had found his calling. But he’s now 20 years into his financial planning career, and it’s just dawned on him.

He’s utterly bored.

Bored with the work. And bored with the industry.

He’s at a standstill.

In recent months, family circumstances have led Stuart to become involved in the social impact sector. He suddenly realises his involvement has extended beyond just a commitment of his time. He now feels what can only be described as a sense of meaning through his volunteer work.

Stuart hasn’t found meaning in his financial planning career in a long time. Maybe ever.

Stuart never thought that there could be more than ideal career path for him. But, he keeps imagining what it might be like to have a more meaningful career. One that he might be excited to get out of bed for every day.

But, no matter how much he daydreams, a transition like this continues to feel far-fetched to Stuart.

Can you relate?

Have you felt like it’s impossible to make a career move as drastic as this?

The fallacy of “the one”

Finding your calling in life is something we’ve been taught to aspire to - something that only the “lucky ones” seem to have. The trouble with this mindset is it implies there is only one thing we each are meant to do. This is unrealistic and also very limiting.

In contemporary times, it’s far more realistic to expect to have multiple careers throughout your life, rather than one you work at your whole life before you retire.

Lifelong learning is key to evolving your career

In fact, today, employers favour prospects who have the traits of long-term employability, rather than those who have been employed long-term in the one job. Employees who are flexible, continually updating their skills and even expanding their skill sets to other industries are more desirable than those who possess the more traditional traits of long-term company loyalty and reliability.

One of the most important traits you can have in these times, is to be a lifelong learner. That means dedicating yourself to the ongoing, voluntary and self-motivated pursuit of knowledge for either personal or professional reasons.

Rather than stay trapped in a career that no longer worked for him, Stuart decided to take a risk and make a change. Over six months, he developed skills that were relevant to the not-for-profit sector, invested in learning more about how the industry works and even trialed employment that allowed him to use some of his existing skills while building on the new ones.

Stuart did it. He figured out how to change careers to one that was better suited to his higher-level needs.

You can do it too.

Want more keen insights into lifelong learning and how to change careers to find fulfilment? Subscribe/follow for updates on my soon-to-be released book, So You’re Career Confused! WTF is Next?

 

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Greg Weiss is  Australia’s leading career coach. He is the author of “So You Got The Job! WTF Is Next?”. The book prescribes a proven, practical 7-step guideline for new employees so they succeed, rather than fail their probation periods and beyond. Find out more about the book at https://www.wtfisnext.wtf

He is the Founder and Director of Onboff an online training and coaching platform that helps HR specialists, coaches and recruiters to deliver exceptional onboarding and offboarding experiences for employees.

He also hosts The Keep: The Employee Experience podcast and runs CareerSupport365.