Effective Onboarding and reducing the impacts of ‘Premature Evacuation’ – The Second S – Structure

In the previous article we touched on our central first S of Shared values and proven strategies for successful alignment, effective onboarding and reducing the impacts of ‘premature evacuation’.

Today we are looking at the Second S Structure. Mastering the formal and informal structures to ensure employees understand the formal reporting lines, as well as the hidden networks for tapping into information and influence.

Mastering the formal and informal structures

We can assist employees and candidates early in the onboarding process to learn much about the nature of an organisation, for what is not immediately apparent. Usually just 10% of the iceberg is visible above the water, with the rest (90%) hidden below. Structure demonstrates the placement of individuals, departments and leadership in relation to each other. But those are just the tip of the iceberg.

Under the surface are the informal structures, employees need to discover the hidden networks which facilitate the exchange of information and influence. As you can see, although the highly visible core of Structure is objective, it is a unique element within the McKinsey 7-S framework, for it has subjective factors too.

Benefits of understanding organisational structures

Grasping the way formal and informal structures work, acts to break down some of the barriers new employees may experience. In particular, it helps communicate effectively and confidently, and reduce voluntary separations within probation period.

My practical, proven strategies for successful alignment, effective onboarding and reducing the impacts of ‘premature evacuation’ is based on the famed McKinsey 7-S alignment framework.

In our next post we will be looking at some of the main points of the third S Style and in future posts we will be looking at the remaining S’s Skill, Strategy, Staff, Systems for effective onboarding and how you can reduce impact of ‘premature evacuation’.

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Greg Weiss is Australia’s leading career coach. He is the author of “So You Got The Job! WTF Is Next?”. The book prescribes a proven, practical 7-step guideline for new employees so they succeed, rather than fail their probation periods and beyond. Find out more about the book at https://www.wtfisnext.wtf
He is the Founder and Director of Onboff an online training and coaching platform that helps HR specialists, coaches and recruiters to deliver exceptional onboarding and offboarding experiences for employees.
He also hosts The Keep: The Employee Experience podcast and runs CareerSupport365.

Keyword: lifelong learner

What Motivates You at Work (and Why It’s Not About the Money)

Mike thought he’d been working towards his dream career. After all, he held a senior role in a high-profile organisation. Along with the power and prestige this afforded him, Mike enjoyed perks like a high salary and an office with a beautiful view.

From the outside, it seemed like Mike had it all.

But, some concerns were starting to cloud Mike’s happiness and one day, he realised that this so-called dream career actually felt more like he’d sold his soul.

Following a company restructure, his core values no longer seemed to align with those of his employer, and the opportunities for professional development he had been working towards had suddenly been taken off the table.

When he broached his concerns with his wife, she told him in no uncertain terms that he could not leave his job or take a pay cut because their lifestyle would suffer too much.

Mike increasingly felt trapped and was too scared to make any changes to his career.

This unhappiness ended up seeping into his personal life, to the point where he lost everything important to him.

Can you relate to Mike’s situation?

Have you ever felt like you’ve sold your soul?

Money and prestige only get you so far
Salary, working conditions and additional perks are what Frederick Herzberg refers to as hygiene factors. In the context of work, these are the tangible environmental factors, that help to make a job more comfortable to do.

It can be tempting to believe that a job with good hygiene factors is enough. But unfortunately, job satisfaction relies on more than fulfilled hygiene factors, because these don’t address any of your higher-level needs and motivations.

 

An enriched career maximises your motivating factors

Motivating factors are intangible in the context of work, and it is these that govern whether you find a job satisfying and meaningful. They include:

  • Achievement
  • The challenge of the work itself
  • The recognition you receive
  • Opportunities for growth, advancement and responsibility

This means that when looking for an enriched career, you need to look beyond the salary or the fancy office. When considering your satisfaction at your current job, or a new opportunity, ask yourself:

  • Is it meaningful to you?
  • Is it going to give you a chance to develop?
  • Will you learn new things?
  • Will you have the opportunity for recognition and achievement?
  • Will you be given responsibility?

Of course, motivating factors can look different from one person to the next. That’s because individuals may prefer to be recognised in different ways, or perceive opportunities for growth differently.

That’s why it’s essential to invest time to figure out what motivates you at work, and the type of career most likely to maximise those factors for you.

For more detailed advice on how to choose a career based on what motivates you at work, you may be interested in my upcoming book. Follow or subscribe for updates on the release!

Keyword: what motivates you at work

  1. “How Will You Measure Your Life” by C. Christensen, J. Allworth & K. Dillon. Published by HarperCollins, 2012.

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Greg Weiss is Australia’s leading career coach. He is the author of “So You Got The Job! WTF Is Next?”. The book prescribes a proven, practical 7-step guideline for new employees so they succeed, rather than fail their probation periods and beyond. Find out more about the book at https://www.wtfisnext.wtf

He is the Founder and Director of Onboff an online training and coaching platform that helps HR specialists, coaches and recruiters to deliver exceptional onboarding and offboarding experiences for employees.

He also hosts The Keep: The Employee Experience podcast and runs CareerSupport365.

 

What is Your Definition of Career Success?

Mark’s an intelligent man. He did well in school - so well in fact, that he had the option of doing anything he wanted.

But, Mark didn’t do what he wanted. Instead, he chose to please his parents and started a law degree.

Mark’s a lawyer now. In fact, he’s just made it to partner, and it seems like Mark has it all.

But Mark’s miserable. And he’s beginning to take it out on everyone around him. He hates who is becoming but can’t seem to get himself back on track.

Have you ever taken a path you thought you were supposed to, only to realise it was never what you wanted?

Living according to someone else’s definition of success is a mistake

Mark has done what many of us do - choosing to follow a path laid out before us because we think others know better or know something that we don’t.

This three-box model of career success where you study, work in one traditional career for your entire life and then retire doesn’t suit everyone, and it’s certainly becoming the exception, rather than the norm in our contemporary, fast-paced times.

The key to your successful career, can’t be determined by anyone else. A fulfilling career means something different to everyone because it relies on maximising those factors that an individual finds enriching.

There is no one-size-fits-all solution and choosing a career to please others certainly won’t get you there either.

Finding your own definition of career success

Eric Barker, author of Barking Up the Wrong Tree, suggests defining success through subjective measures. According to Barker, those are:

Achievement: Do you feel like you’re winning?

Legacy: Do you feel like you’re influencing others in a positive way?

Significance: Do you feel like you’re needed by the people closest to you?

Happiness: Do you feel like you’re enjoying life?

With the help of my career coaching and his own definition of success, Mark decided it was time to down tools on his law career. It’s the best thing he ever did, and his new career in the film production space fulfils him in a way his law career never did (and never could).

Would you like some help identifying your own definition of career success? Contact me or get your hands on my new book - coming soon!

Keyword: definition of career success

*****

Greg Weiss is Australia’s leading career coach. He is the author of “So You Got The Job! WTF Is Next?”. The book prescribes a proven, practical 7-step guideline for new employees so they succeed, rather than fail their probation periods and beyond. Find out more about the book at https://www.wtfisnext.wtf

He is the Founder and Director of Onboff an online training and coaching platform that helps HR specialists, coaches and recruiters to deliver exceptional onboarding and offboarding experiences for employees.

He also hosts The Keep: The Employee Experience podcast and runs CareerSupport365.

Can You Boost Productivity in Your Workplace Without Buying a Ping Pong Table?

Can You Boost Productivity in Your Workplace Without Buying a Ping Pong Table?

How to make your employees love you after they leave you

How to make your employees love you after they leave you. | CareerSupport365_roller-coaster-ride-first-few-seconds-are-critical

image credit: https://goo.gl/mZOjP3

 

We all know that the first few seconds are critical in making good first impressions.

But research shows that both the most emotional and the last experiences matter most for long-term memories, stories, and impressions.

This is explained by Peak-End theory, made famous by the Nobel Laureate Daniel Kahneman.

To help understand this, Kahneman breaks the Self into 2 parts: the Experiencing Self and the Remembering Self.

The Remembering Self is the part of us that is full of stories, whereas the Experience Self is one that has done the event.

Kahneman emphasises that it is the peaks of emotions, the highs and lows as well as the feelings at the very end of an event that create the lasting impression.

This is shown in the following diagram:

How to make your employees love you after they leave you. | CareerSupport365_positive-memories-and-peak-end-theory

image credit: http://www.thepositiveencourager.global/?p=7161

 

Maybe you can relate this to any roller coaster ride you have been on. If you are like me, a roller coaster ride normally starts a little slow – with your Experience Self anticipating excitement, fear and dread (high emotions) from the moment you sit down and get automatically locked in to place.

Your Experience Self knows that there will be hills to climb only to be met by gut-wrenching slopes on descent, over what might seem like an eternity. (When will this end?) More often than not it is that last crazy roll or water feature that is the wow… But it is your Remembering Self that recalls time and again some of the twists and turns and especially how the ride finished up.

I have been on many rides, but normally it's the last few seconds that I remember most. Case in point: Splash Mountain, Wet and Wild… I am sure it's the same with you.

How to make your employees love you after they leave you. | CareerSupport365_splash-mountain

image credit: https://goo.gl/xFY4PZ

 

Peak-End theory can be applied in a number of contexts:

Everyday we experience Peak-End theory in play.

1. A customer experience: the during the sale, end of sale and post sale experiences. Word of mouth and stories on the experiences are what fuel dinner table discussions.

2. A dining experience: how does the waiting staff treat the diner; what's the food like; how are complaints handled; how is the bill presented; what were the end-of-the-dinner mints like – why is it that we recall the mints that accompanied the bill the most?

How to make your employees love you after they leave you. | CareerSupport365_after-dinner-mints

image credit: https://goo.gl/GNrQjj

 

3. An employee being laid off: how is the message communicated; the experience of breaking the news; the communication process; the dignity factor; the support afforded to the exiting employee.

It's no wonder that when there are poor last experiences, it motivates an ex-employee to post adverse comments online.

How to make your employees love you after they leave you. | CareerSupport365_working-for-a-company-with-a-bad-reputation

image credit: https://goo.gl/jk2tD2

 

Conclusion:

It has been often said that you only get one chance to make a first impression. The same can be said about last impressions.

Regardless of whatever the event is, a leader thinks through how the event will be experienced – including the highs and the lows – but pay especially deep attention to the last/end experience, the one that supports the Remembering Self.

Those that end an event with a positive hand off are bound to be remembered far more positively – creating e stories and memories of your interactions even when the middle might have been anything but that.

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About the author:

Greg Weiss is one of Australia’s most renowned career coaches. He is the author of “So You Got A Job, WTF Is Next”. The book prescribes a proven, practical 7 step guideline for new employees so they succeed, rather than fail their probation periods and beyond. Find out more about the book at https://www.wtfisnext.wtf/

He is the Founder and Director of Onboff an online training and coaching platform that helps HR specialists, coaches and recruiters to deliver exceptional onboarding and offboarding experiences for employees.

Greg also hosts The Keep: The Employee Experience podcast and runs CareerSupport365.